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GERGER-SNOderwitz

Data | History | Map | Photo gallery | Comments

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Sprungschanze am Spitzberg:

K-Point: 20 m
Further jumps: no
Plastic matting: no
Year of construction: 1922
Conversions: 1933
Status: destroyed
Ski club: Skiklub Oderwitz
Coordinates: 50.961444, 14.691973 Google Maps OpenStreetMap

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History:

At Spitzberg in Oberoderwitz, a distinctive, 510 m high cone-shaped hill in the Lausatian Highlands, the ski club of Oderwitz built a ski jumping hill in 1922. The hill was located below the northern slope and allowed jumps of around 20 meters. In the early 1930's skiers from the ski and hiking club / alpine club of Varnsdorf also competed on the hill and helped to enlarge it such that distances of 30 meters could be reached.
The ski jumping hill gained fame beyond the region in summer 1936, when the ski club promoted the "first ski jumping competition on artificial snow in Germany". Thus, spruce needles served as inrun and landing surfaces and for better slipperiness the skis were dabbed with petroleum. Further details on this event are not known, but ultimately this method didn't make the break through for summer skiing.
Furthermore, there was also a toboggan ride at Spitzberg, which was still used in early 1950's, when ski jumping activities had already ended.

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