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USAUSA-UTSalt Lake City

Spruces

Data | History | Hill records | Map | Photo gallery | Comments

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Engen Hill:

K-Point: ca. 40 m
Men Longest jump: 42.7 m (140 ft) (Alf Engen NOR, 1936-01-02)
Men Winter Hill record: 42.4 m (139 ft) (Alf Engen NOR, 1936-01-03)
Further jumps: no
Plastic matting: no
Year of construction: 1936
Operating until: ca. 1960
Status: destroyed
Coordinates: 40.639697, -111.63861 Google Maps OpenStreetMap

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History:

In 1935, Mark Strand, then vice president of the National Ski Association, announced that the association would build a new ski jump in an area called Spruces in Big Cottonwood Canyon in the hills east of Salt Lake City. The place was chosen by Alf Engen, the famous jumper of Norwegian origin living in Salt Lake City. The original assumptions were about possible distances up to 350 feet (over 106 m), which would then have been a world record distance.
The US championship in 1937 was to be held on this "flying hill". However, limitations of funds due to the great economic crisis resulted in the implementation of the project on a much smaller scale. Eventually, the size of the hill was approx. 40 meters. The opening of the facility took place on January 3, 1937. In recognition of his contribution to the construction, the hill was named after Alf Engen. Engen himself showed the two longest jumps of the competition (139 and 137 feet), confidently winning. Already before the competition, he had performed the probably longest jump in the history of the hill of 140 feet. The ski jump was in operation at least until the end of the 1950s.

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Hill records K40 (Men):

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Map:

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